3
ICAP

Building the future

…of global public health

Current Fellows

KAVITHA GANESAN
KAVITHA GANESAN

Kavitha Ganesan is a third-year doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology and pre-doctoral fellow in the Global HIV Implementation Science Research Training Fellowship. Her research mentor is Dr. Andrea Low, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health who is currently the lead epidemiologist on the multi-country Population-Based HIV Impact Assessment (PHIA), and the Project Director for the Lesotho Violence Against Children Survey (VACS). Ms. Ganesan is working with Dr. Low on several projects using PHIA data on gaps in the HIV care continuum and characterizing social, demographic and clinical attributes of those missed in the UNAIDS 90-90-90 2020 targets. She is also working on modeling how reaching those missed in the cascade affect incidence of HIV in PHIA countries. She has an MPH from George Washington University in Epidemiology & Biostatistics with a focus on infectious diseases. Her past research experiences include prevention of mother to child HIV transmission with the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT) and monitoring and evaluating Emergency Department HIV screening programs in pediatric facilities located in Washington, DC. Prior to starting the fellowship, Ms. Ganesan managed PEPFAR’s programmatic research portfolio partnered through the US Military HIV Program and Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Africa with a strong focus on key and priority populations. Projects under this portfolio include 1) the African Cohort Study (AFRICOS), 2) Basic Program Evaluations (BPE’s) in Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, and Nigeria, 3) Improving retention in HIV Care and treatment services through the development of a network of ART clinics within the fishing communities in Uganda; and 4) Feasibility of implementing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among HIV negative adolescent girls and young women sex works in Uganda. Ms. Ganesan’s research interests are in HIV implementation science and program evaluation among vulnerable populations in resource-limited settings.

CRAIG HECK
CRAIG HECK

Craig Heck is a third-year student in the Epidemiology Ph.D. program. His research mentor is Dr. Quarraisha Abdool Karim, Professor of Epidemiology at CUIMC and Associate Scientific Director of CAPRISA. Under Dr. Abdool Karim’s guidance, he is researching optimization strategies to improve the accessibility, availability, and usability of HIV prevention services and strategies for adolescents and young adults in South Africa. Currently, using CAPRISA 007 data, Mr. Heck is investigating discordance between perceived and actual HIV risk among secondary school students and how the location and concentration of community elements (e.g., bars, clinics, churches) influence HIV risk. In addition, Mr. Heck is examining data from CAPRISA 084, an oral PrEP demonstration project, to identify implementation bottlenecks, structural barriers, and behavioral phenomena that affect oral PrEP initiation, adherence, and continuation. He is also assisting Dr. Delivette Castor with COVID-19 research and activities to inform the roll-out and scale-up of the Dapivirine Ring in sub-Saharan Africa. Lastly, Mr. Heck is collaborating with Dr. Andrea Low to illuminate correlates of HIV among adolescents and young adults across multiple PHIA countries. Prior to the Fellowship, Mr. Heck coordinated and facilitated capacity strengthening workshops and conducted analyses for implementation science studies under the DREAMS Partnership. He received a Master of Public Health degree in Population and Family Health, with a certificate in Public Health Research Methods, from MSPH in 2017.

ALEYA KHALIFA
ALEYA KHALIFA

Aleya Khalifa, MPH is a second-year student in the Epidemiology PhD program and a pre-doctoral fellow in the Global HIV Implementation Science Training Program. Ms. Khalifa’s research aims to improve HIV prevention programs for mobile populations, including both climate and labor migrants. With her research mentor Dr. Joanne Mantell, Ms. Khalifa contributes to studies on innovative service delivery models, such as differentiated PrEP care, for these hard-to-reach populations. Ms. Khalifa is also interested in developing new survey, cohort and modeling methods that can improve community-level HIV estimates in the context of increasing population mobility. Prior to starting the fellowship, Ms. Khalifa worked with UNICEF to monitor the global HIV response for children, adolescents and women. Ms. Khalifa has also worked with the CDC on projects related to HIV surveillance, population-based surveys, and epidemic modelling in sub-Saharan African countries. Ms. Khalifa received her MPH in Epidemiology from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

LORI MILLER
LORI MILLER

Dr. Lori Miller is an epidemiologist and interdisciplinary researcher. Her career, spanning over 25 years working and living in low-resource settings, intersects global health, human rights, and international development. Dr. Miller’s work designing, implementing, and evaluating public health research and programmes has focused on vaginal microbicides for HIV prevention, sexual and reproductive health, gender and empowerment, capacity building in sub-Saharan Africa, participatory approaches, and research ethics in biomedical HIV prevention clinical trials globally. Her mixed-methods research has examined adherence to vaginal microbicides in clinical trials in Africa, and her current research focuses on methods to support women to communicate their HIV prevention choices to male partners and navigate conflicts that may arise. She has extensive experience teaching and designing curricula using participatory methods. She received her PhD in Epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and earned her Master of Health Science in Disease Prevention and Control in International Health from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Dr. Miller served as a science teacher in Eritrea while in the Peace Corps.

DOMONIQUE REED
DOMONIQUE REED

Domonique M. Reed, MPH is a third-year doctoral student in the Epidemiology Department and a second-year pre-doctoral fellow in the Global HIV Implementation Science Training Program. Her previous research at the U.S. Military HIV Research Program focused on the complexities of partner dynamics and the psychosocial implications of serostatus disclosure on engagement in HIV care services. In the two years of her doctoral program, Domonique worked with Dr. Jessica Justman to assess endorsement of inequitable gender norms as an effect modifier for HIV-infection in adolescent girls and young adult women in age-disparate and intergenerational partnerships; as well as correlates of couples HIV testing uptaking among adolescents and young using Population-based HIV Impact Assessment data. Domonique is also interested in novel data science methods for fusing HIV-related population-based surveys to create large public health datasets. She completed her B.S. in Community Health at the University of Maryland in 2014 and her MPH in Epidemiology at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in 2017.

JONATHAN RUSSELL
JONATHAN RUSSELL

Mr. Russell is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology and a pre-doctoral fellow in the Global HIV Implementation Science Research Training Fellowship. He is a part of the Spatial Epidemiology Lab and is mentored by the lab’s director, Dr. Dustin T. Duncan. His research interests focus on HIV prevention in U.S. men who have sex with men (MSM)—specifically on the implementation of PrEP and TasP—and on health disparities among sexual minority men. He has an MPH in epidemiology from the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, where his master’s thesis explored the racial and ethnic disparities in Tuberculosis incidence among New York City’s U.S.-born population. Before returning to Columbia he was an epidemiologist with the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS), a longitudinal evaluation of the long-term effects of HIV infection and antiretroviral medication among perinatally HIV-infected or exposed children and young adults. As part of PHACS, his research assessed different treatment regimens and their impact on hearing and language, mitochondrial function, and oral health outcomes. Mr. Russell has served as a teaching assistant for the Department of Epidemiology for the following courses: Epidemiology I and II, and Infectious Disease Epidemiology.

Cho-Hee Shrader
Cho-Hee Shrader

Cho-Hee Shrader (she/her), PhD, MPH, is an NIH T32 Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Global HIV Implementation Science in ICAP at Columbia University. Dr. Shrader’s research explores the intersection of how social networks and neighborhood characteristics impact minority health disparities, such as HIV, stress, and substance use disorder among sexual, gender, and racial/ethnic minority communities. Dr. Shrader’s research interests empass both the global and the domestic South. Additionally, Dr. Shrader’s research incorporates implementation science and its influences on HIV prevention intervention success. Dr. Shrader received her PhD in Prevention Science and Community Health which was funded by a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Minority Health Disparities. Her dissertation explored how personal social networks and neighborhood determinants influenced Latino/x men who have sex with men (LMSM) access to PrEP and PrEP-related information. Dr. Shrader received her MPH in Global Health from Emory University and completed her BS in Physiology at the University of Iowa and the University of Cape Town.