• Date: July 21-24, 2019
  • Location: Centro Citibanamex, Mexico City

 

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Saturday, July 20, 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Hotel Camino Real Polanco, Mexico City
More information on the ICAP site
Full IAS TB/HIV symposium schedule

Andrea Howard, MD, MS, director of ICAP’s clinical and training unit, and Peter Preko, MBChB, MPH, CQUIN program director, will present at the IAS TB/HIV 2019 Symposium as part of IAS 2019 in Mexico City.

Dr. Howard’s presentation, “TB prevention in HIV-associated TB: opportunities and challenges,” will take place from 11:10 – 11:25 a.m. during “Session 3: Opportunities to scale up TB preventive treatment,” co-chaired by Vanessa Rouzier (GHESKIO, Haiti) and Kate Thomson (The Global Fund, Switzerland).

Dr. Preko’s presentation, “Use of differentiated service delivery approaches for TB prevention and care,” will take place from 1:50 – 2:05 p.m. during “Session 4: Field perspectives in scaling up TB preventive treatment among people living with HIV,” co-chaired by Sevim Ahmedov (USAID, USA) and Adeeba Kamarulzaman (University of Malaya, Malaysia).

The symposium is co-chaired by Dr. Alfredo Ponce de León (National Institute Salvador Zubirán in Mexico) and Dr. Beatriz Grinsztejn (Instituto National de Infectologia Evando Chagas-Fiocruz, Brazil and IAS Governing Council member).

 

Sunday, July 21, 8:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Palacio de Iturbide 1 y 2
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/120

Organizer:
International AIDS Society

Co-Chairs:
Meg Doherty, World Health Organization, Switzerland
Getrude Ncube, Ministry of Health and Child Care, Zimbabwe

Summary:
What is needed to make linkage effective? How can we ensure our linkage approaches drive improved ART initiation and retention? How can we adapt these approaches for re-engagement of people who have been on treatment in the past but have fallen out of care? This session will address these questions through a differentiated service delivery lens. It will explore the term “sticky linkage” and its usefulness, the importance of global and country guidance on linkage and a minimum linkage service delivery package. Presentations will focus on filling gaps in the evidence base highlighting client-centered approaches. Presentations and debate will consider the importance of effective tracing approaches, the utility of compulsory adherence support upon re-entry and the need for clear country standard operating procedures on re-engagement to reduce delays in restarting treatment. The target audience for this session is policy makers, program implementers and implementation scientists.

Agenda:

PART 1: “STICKY LINKAGE” IN THE TREAT ALL ERA

  • Opening framing on “sticky linkage”
    Anna Grimsrud, International AIDS Society (IAS), South Africa
  • Opening discussion
    Kate Dovel, PIH, Malawi
    Stella Kentutsi, NAFOPHANU, Uganda

PART 2: LATEST EVIDENCE AND NEW STRATEGIES

  • A joint universal access point for couples in South Africa
    Natasha Davies, Wits RHI, South Africa
  • Peer providers to support from HIV self-testing to ART initiation in Burundi
    Dismas Gashobotse, FHI 360, Burundi
  • System redesign to improve linkage and ART initiation rates in Angola
    Juliana Soares Linn, ICAP, United States
  • Community-based service models to improve linkage to and retention in ART for female sex workers in Tanzania
    Lung Vu, Population Council/Project SOAR, United States
  • Segmentation of South Africa men – insights to improve linkage
    Shawn Malone, PSI, South Africa

PART 3: REFRAMING FOR RE-ENGAGEMENT – BEYOND THE 90S

  • Overview of re-engagement
    Lynne Wilkinson, International AIDS Society (IAS), South Africa
  • Lessons learned from South Africa’s Siyenza – “February Frenzy” to re-engage those cycling out or at risk of cycling out of care
    Jonathan Grund, CDC, South Africa
  • Who should be prioritized for re-engagement tracing?
    Mpande Mukumbwa-Mwenechanya, CIDRZ, Zambia
    Kimberly Green, PATH, Vietnam

 

Sunday, July 21, 10:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Casa Montejo 1
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/55

Organizers:
ICAP at Columbia University and the University of California, San Francisco

Co-Chairs:
Jessica Justman, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
George Rutherford, University of California, San Francisco, United States

Summary:
As countries make strides towards universal diagnosis, treatment and viral suppression for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implementing strategies to identify new HIV cases and rapidly intervening to stop the chain of transmission will be critical. This satellite session will focus on updates from the field on rolling out the rapid test for HIV recent infection (RTRI) as part of the Tracking with Recency Assays to Control the Epidemic (TRACE) project. The session will feature speakers from Ethiopia, Malawi and Rwanda who will share early results on leveraging the new testing technology to identify geographical clusters of new infections and targeting prevention efforts to halt ongoing transmission. The session will consider ethical aspects of RTRI in order to ensure the rights of PLHIV are protected, and representatives from civil society organizations will discuss the important role they play in interpreting and using the recency data.

Presentations:

  • Accelerating Epidemic Control with Recency
    Ambassador Deborah Birx, US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), United States
  • Laboratory validation of RTRI and field performance
    Ernest Yufenyuy, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Surveillance and Public Health Response using Recency: Early Evidence from the Field
    Getachew Tollera, Deputy Director General, Ethiopian Public Health Institute (EPHI)
    Placidie Mugwaneza, Rwanda Biomedical Center, MOH
    Nguyen Hoang Long, Director, Vietnam Administration for AIDS Control
  • Recent Infection Surveillance among Pregnant Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Malawi
    Rose Nyirenda, Ministry of Health
  • Panel Discussion on using recency data to benefit PLHIV, ethical considerations and program implications
    Andrea Kim, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Moderator)
    Amalia Girón, Universidad de la Valle, Guatemala
    Rachel Baggaley, World Health Organization
    Gregorio Millett, AmfAR
    Wame Mosime, ITPC
    Jerome Singh, University of KwaZulu-Natal 

 

Sunday, July 21, 2:45 – 4:45 p.m.
Palacio de Valparaíso 1
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/154

Organizer:
WHO

Co-Chairs:
Elaine Abrams, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
Serge Eholie, Treichville University Teaching Hospital, Cote D’Ivoire

Summary:
WHO will present highlights from recent updates to the 2018 Interim Guidelines on first-line and second-line antiretroviral regimens. This satellite will review the current status of safety and efficacy of DTG based ARV regimens, including the basic science models, pregnancy cohorts, clinical trial evidence, risk benefit modelling and community values and preferences that fed into updated recommendations. WHO will share the most recent information on NNRTI pre-treatment resistance and implications for the use of DTG in first-line HIV treatment. The satellite will also share country policy uptake and implementation of DTG based regimens and explore how ministries have addressed the signal of NTD risk though a women’s center approach, integration of DTG use and SRH, and monitoring for side effects. A panel with representation from Ministries of Health, researchers, implementers and women living with HIV will review the implications of these new directions for HIV treatment programs.

Agenda:

Welcome by co-chairs

  • Elaine Abrams, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • Serge Eholie, Treichville University Teaching Hospital, Cote D’Ivoire

Presentations

  • Directions from the updated WHO guidelines: the role of DTG for treating and preventing HIV infection – Opening remarks
    Ren Minghui, WHO, Switzerland
  • DTG based regimens in first- and second-line HIV treatment – updates to the WHO guidelines
    Meg Doherty, WHO, Switzerland
  • Review of what we know now about the signal of risk of neural tube defects with DTG use at conception
    Lynne Mofenson, Independent Consultant, United States
  • Modeling the benefits and harms of DTG use in pregnancy
    Landon Myer, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • The role of pre-treatment NNRTI drug resistance and DTG use – evidence from the 2019 Global Report on HIVDR
    Silvia Bertagnolio, WHO, Switzerland

Q&A

Panel Discussion: Implementation of DTG: How to scale up treatment, respect client choice and monitor for risk and integrate SRH – what we have learned in the last year and how to apply this to the years to come

Presentations

  • Views from women seeking HIV treatment
    Valeriia Rachynska, All Ukrainian Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS, Ukraine
  • Views from Botswana’s country programme
    Tendani Gaolathe, BCCP and Harvard-Botswana AIDS Initiative, Botswana
  • Paediatric Treatment and care
    Angela Mushavi, Zimbabwe Ministry of Health and Childcare, Zimbabwe
  • Views on DTG use from Latin America
    Trevor Peter, CHAI, United States
  • How to improve access to DTG and SRH services
    Imelda Mahaka, Pangea & AFROCAB, Zimbabwe
  • PEPFAR remarks on TLD transition
    Ambassador Deborah Birx, US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), United States

Q&A

Closing remarks

  • Elaine Abrams, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • Serge Eholie, Treichville University Teaching Hospital, Cote D’Ivoire

 

Sunday, July 21, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.
Casa Montejo 1
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/46

Organizer:
ICAP at Columbia University

Co-Chairs:
Jessica Justman, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
Tsitsi Apollo, Ministry of Health and Child Care, Zimbabwe

Summary:
Much progress has been made in designing efficient and people-centered Differentiated Service Delivery (DSD) treatment models for people with “stable” HIV who are doing well on ART. In contrast, there has been less innovation about service delivery for people with advanced HIV disease – who still comprise almost one-third of people initiating ART – and those at high risk of disease progression.

ICAP at Columbia University is a leader in the design, development, implementation and evaluation of HIV programs, working hand in hand with Ministries of Health (MOH) and diverse partners. ICAP’s HIV Coverage, Quality and Impact Network (CQUIN) brings countries together to share DSD innovations and to work together towards sustainable high quality HIV programs.

This satellite will convene implementers from MOH, civil society, implementing partners, donors and other stakeholders.

Presentations:

  • Introductions & Framing Remarks
    Jessica Justman, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • The challenge of advanced HIV disease
    Satvinder Singh, World Health Organization, Switzerland
  • Differentiated Service Delivery models for people at high risk of HIV disease progression: a “call to action” from the CQUIN learning network
    Peter O. Preko, ICAP at Columbia University, Eswatini
  • The PEPFAR perspective
    Catherine Godfrey, PEPFAR / Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator, United States
  • Lessons from PHIA: Late diagnosis and partner risk
    Andreas Haas, ICAP at Columbia University, Switzerland
  • Tackling the procurement bottleneck to enable DSD models for people with advanced HIV disease
    Carolyn Amole, Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), United States
  • DSD for people displaced by conflict: a perspective from South Sudan
    Shambel Aragaw, ICAP at Columbia University, South Sudan
  • DSD models for people at high risk of HIV disease progression: community perspective
    Stella Kentutsi, NAFOPHANU, Uganda

 

Sunday, July 21, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.
Palacio de Iturbide 3
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/49

Organizer:
UNAIDS

Chair:
Jose Antonio Izazola Licea, UNAIDS, Switzerland
Peter Godrey-Faussett, UNAIDS, Switzerland

Summary:
This session will aim to inform participants about the process that UNAIDS is leading to set targets for the global AIDS response post-2020. Although the session will focus on information sharing, participants will have an opportunity to contribute to the discussion and provide inputs.

ICAP founder and global director Wafaa El-Sadr, MD, MPH, MPA, will join Quarraisha Abdool Karim, PhD, and George Ayala, PsyD, in presenting outcomes and key considerations in setting targets from the Prevention, Treatment, and Social Enablers technical meetings. The session will be chaired by Shannon Hader, MD, MPH, deputy executive director of program for UNAIDS.

Presentations:

  • Opening remarks
    Shannon Hader, UNAIDS, Switzerland
  • Keynote speaker: The response to HIV in the next decade
    Ambassador Deborah Birx, U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), United States
  • Outlining the deliverable of 2025 Targets process – and the potential influences
    Adele Benzaken, Ministry of Health, Brazil
  • Modeling the end of AIDS: Inside the black box – outline of the modeling approach
    John Stover, Avenir Health, United States
  • Outcomes of technical consultations in setting targets: Testing and Treatment
    Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • Outcomes of technical consultations in setting targets: Primary Prevention
    Quarraisha Abdool Karim, Columbia University/CAPRISA, South Africa
  • Outcomes of technical consultations in setting targets: Social Enablers
    George Ayala, MPact, United States
  • Next steps and timeline
    Jose Antonio Izazola Licea, UNAIDS, Switzerland
  • Advocacy Needs as targets for the HIV response
    Jorge Alejandro Saavedra Lopez, AHF, United States
  • Government perspective on setting 2025 targets for HIV
    Aleny Couto, Minister Of Health, Mozambique, Mozambique
  • Closing Remarks
    Peter Godfrey-Faussett, UNAIDS, Switzerland
    Jose Antonio Izazola Licea, UNAIDS, Switzerland

 


Posters
Monday hours: 11:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Presentation hours: 12:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Sala B (Exhibition Level)

  • High rates of viral load suppression among patients participating in home-based nurse-led ART adherence support intervention in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan (MOPEB262)
    Presented by: Anna Deryabina
  • Male partner age and HIV infection among young women in cohabitating partnerships in five countries in southern Africa (MOPEC344)
    Presented by: Andrea Low
  • Achieving the “third 90” in western Kenya: A Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) to improve viral load utilization at 30 health facilities in Siaya County, Kenya (MOPED538)
    Presented by: Gillian Dougherty
  • A Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) Approach to Improve Early Infant Diagnosis (EID) and Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation at 25 Health Facilities in Lusaka Urban District, Zambia (MOPED541)
    Presented by: Gillian Dougherty
  • Optimizing treatment models for people living with HIV in urban Zimbabwe: Findings from a mixed methods study (MOPED544)
    Presented by: Jennifer Zech
  • Systematic Review of the Evidence Regarding the Effectiveness of Community–Based Primary Health Care in Improving HIV/AIDS Outcomes for Mothers and Children (MOPED546)
    Presented by: Ivy Mushamiri
  • Reaching the last mile in Angola – Optimizing the HIV care cascade through intensified implementation support, the I-Surge (MOPED570)
    Presented by: Juliana Soares Linn
  • Patient feedback surveys about healthcare workers among women attending PMTCT services in eSwatini (MOPED612)
    Presented by: Ilka Rondinelli
  • Early results from Test and Start implementation in Luanda, Angola (MOPED633)
    Presented by: Juliana Soares Linn
  • Multi-Country Evaluation of Survival and HIV-Free Survival among Children under 3 Years of Age of Women Living with HIV in Eight Sub-Saharan African Countries: Results from Population-based HIV Impact Assessments (LBPEC21)
    Presented by: Eugenie Poirot

 

Monday, July 22, 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.
Palacio de Valparaíso 1
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/170

Organizers:
UNAIDS, PEPFAR, EGPAF, ICAP at Columbia University, UNICEF, and WHO

Co-Chairs:
Ambassador Deborah Birx, U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), United States
Shannon Hader, UNAIDS, Switzerland

Summary:
Ambassador Deborah Birx, US Global AIDS Coordinator (PEPFAR) and Dr Shannon Hader, UNAIDS Deputy Executive Director, Programme will co-chair the launch of the Start Free Stay Free AIDS Free report 2019 – a global update of progress in access to HIV testing, prevention, treatment and care for children, adolescents and mothers and elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The main findings of the report will be presented and the co-chairs of each of the Start Free, Stay Free and AIDS Free technical working groups will present progress and challenges and highlight best practices. We will invite updates from the community and country perspective and conclude with a discussion on the key actions needed to accelerate progress towards the 2020 targets at country level and globally. The launch will serve as a rallying call to the international community to renew their strong commitment for concerted joint action to achieve the 2020 targets.

Presentations:

  • Welcome and opening remarks from Chairs
  • Overview of progress – Start Free Stay Free AIDS Free 2019 report
    Shannon Hader, UNAIDS, Switzerland
  • Community perspective
  • Start Free – progress, challenges and best practices
    Fatima Tsiouris, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
    Alasdair Reid, UNAIDS, Switzerland
  • Stay Free – Progress, challenges and best practices
    Chewe Luo, UNICEF, United States
    Janet Saul, CDC, United States
  • AIDS Free – Progress, challenges and best practices
    Meg Doherty, World Health Organization, Switzerland
    Charles Lyons, Elizabeth Glazer Pediatric AIDS Foundation, United States
  • Country perspectives
  • Moderated discussion on country priority actions to accelerate towards the 2020 targets
  • Conclusion and 2020 vision
    Ambassador Deborah Birx, US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), United States

 

Monday, July 22, 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.
Palacio de Iturbide 1 y 2
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/160

Organizer:
World Health Organization

Co-Chairs:
Satvinder Singh, World Health Organization, Switzerland
Francois Kesner, Ministry of Health, Haiti

Summary:
This satellite will highlight the need to address quality gaps within HIV programs, share WHO guidance on strengthening quality of HIV services, country experiences in implementation of national quality strategies, and community perspectives on demand-side actions to support quality care.

Presentations:

  • Why Quality Matters in ART Programmes
    Charles Holmes, Georgetown University, United States
  • Update on Global Progress in ART Outcomes: Need for a Quality Revolution
    Silvia Bertagnolio, World Health Organization, Switzerland
  • Quality Approaches to reach 90:90:90 and prevent HIVDR: the importance of national quality frameworks
    Andrew Likaka, Quality Management and Digital Health, Ministry of Health, Malawi
  • Panel Discussion: the essential components of improving quality of HIV service delivery, from collaboratives to quality systems
    Solange Baptiste, International Treatment Preparedness Coalition, South Africa
    Aleny Couto, Minister Of Health, Mozambique, Mozambique
    Felipe Perini, Ministry of Health, Brazil
    Judy Khanyola, ICAP, Columbia University, Kenya
    Bruce Agins, University of California – San Francisco, United States

 

Monday, July 22, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Casa Montejo 1
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/45

Organizer:
ICAP at Columbia University

Co-Chairs:
Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP at Columbia University
Vindi Singh, World Health Organization

Summary:
TB is the leading cause of death for people living with HIV, but TB prevention and treatment are lagging. As countries scale up HIV differentiated service delivery (DSD), there are important implications for TB/HIV services. Shifting recipients of care who are doing well on ART to less-intensive models is hoped to improve satisfaction, provider workload, and health system efficiency: it also means that many people on ART will be spending less time at health facilities. Appointment spacing and fast-track models require fewer and faster clinic visits. Other models will shift services to the community level. These changes create both challenges and opportunities for TB/HIV service delivery. Will these less-intensive models be able to provide effective TB screening and referrals? Can TPT be delivered safely to patients in community settings?

This satellite will convene participants from MOH, civil society, implementing partners, donors and other stakeholders.

Presentations:

  • Introductions & Framing Remarks
    Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • TB screening and differentiated service delivery: state of the art
    Andrea Howard, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • TB preventive treatment and differentiated service delivery: state of the art
    Salome Charalambous, Aurum Institute, South Africa
  • TB/HIV and DSD: the perspective from PEPFAR
    Hank Tomlinson, U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, United States
  • Highlights from the TB/HIV pre-meeting symposium
    Adeeba Kamarulzaman, University of Malaya, Malaysia
  • DSD and TB/HIV services in Zimbabwe
    Tsitsi Apollo, Ministry of Health and Child Care, Zimbabwe
  • DSD and TB/HIV services in Uganda
    Cordelia Katureebe, Ministry of Health, Uganda
  • DSD and TB/HIV services: Community Perspective
    Stella Kentutsi, NAFOPHANU, Uganda

 


Posters
Tuesday hours: 10:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Presentation hours: 12:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Sala B (Exhibition Level)

  • The M-Spot 2 Study: Feasibility of measuring viral load longitudinally using home-collected dried blood spot specimens of high-risk MSM living with HIV (TUPDD0103)
    Presented by: Richard Teran (oral presentation Tuesday, July 23, 1:00-2:00 p.m., Casa del Diezmo 1 y 2 [SR5], TUPDD01)
  • Integrating Family Planning Services into HIV Care in Zambia: Baseline Results (TUPED652)
    Presented by: Brenda Senyana-Ouattara
  • Multi-Country Evaluation of Survival and HIV-Free Survival among Children under 3 Years of Age of Women Living with HIV in Eight Sub-Saharan African Countries: Results from Population-based HIV Impact Assessments (LBPEC21)
    Presented by: Eugenie Poirot

 

Tuesday, July 23, 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.
Casa del Diezmo 3 y 4
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/51

Organizer:
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, facilitated by ICAP at Columbia University

Chair:
Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP at Columbia University, United States

Moderator:
Carlo André Oliveras Rodriguez, Adolescent HIV Treatment Coalition, Puerto Rico

Summary:
Ending stigma and discrimination (SD) is key to achieving an AIDS-free generation. This forum will include results of a recent programmatic assessment of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)-funded activities addressing HIV-related stigma and discrimination. Implementers receiving PEPFAR funding reported on their activities related to HIV stigma and discrimination, including work with populations most vulnerable to stigma and discrimination such as people living with HIV and key populations. In addition, we will highlight efforts to address SD in PEPFAR-supported health facilities and community programs. PEPFAR will highlight success stories and best practices as well as remaining gaps and UNAIDS will join in our discussion. Panelists will also engage audience members regarding how to translate best practices in PEPFAR programming to eliminate stigma and discrimination to achieve the goal of epidemic control.

Presentations:

  • Introduction and Welcome
    Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • Opening Remarks
    Ambassador Deborah Birx, U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), United States
  • Interventions and Best Practices to Eliminate Stigma and Discrimination in PEPFAR Programs: Results from a Programmatic Assessment
    Cassia Wells, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
  • Panel Discussion on Best Practices, Reflections, Gaps, and Recommendations for Next Steps to Eliminate Stigma and Discrimination
    Irene Benech, CDC, United States
    Vienna Nightingale, U.S. Department of Defense, United States
    Hannah Gardi, U.S. Peace Corps, United States
    Maria A. Carrasco, United States Agency for International Development, United States
  • Question and Answer Session 1
    Carlo André Oliveras Rodriguez, Adolescent HIV Treatment Coalition (ATC), Puerto Rico
  • NIH Research on Stigma and Discrimination: Gathering the Evidence and Information for Best Practices
    Maureen Goodenow, National Institutes of Health, United States
  • Catalyzing and Accelerating Implementation of Country Commitments to End HIV-related Stigma and Discrimination – A Global Partnership for Action to Eliminate all forms of HIV-related Stigma and Discrimination
    Shannon Hader, UNAIDS, Switzerland
  • The Global Fund “Breaking Down Barriers” Initiative to Comprehensively Address Human Rights-related Barriers to HIV and TB services, including Stigma and Discrimination
    Kate Thomson, The Global Fund, United States
  • Question and Answer Session 2
    Carlo André Oliveras Rodriguez, Adolescent HIV Treatment Coalition (ATC), Puerto Rico
  • Summary
    Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP at Columbia University, United States

 

Track D – Social, behavioural and implementation science
Tuesday, July 23, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Casa del Diezmo 1 y 2

Co-Chairs:
John Sauceda, University of California, San Francisco, United States
Mallory Johnson, UCSF, United States

Presentations:

  • 13:00 – Measuring anticipated sex-work stigma: Scale validation and association with HIV and non-HIV service utilization (TUPDD0101)
    Christin Stewart, RTI International, United States
  • 13:10 – Mapping key population hotspots in Nigeria for targeted HIV program planning (TUPDD0102)
    Julia Lo, University of Maryland School of Medicine, United States
  • 13:20 – The M-Spot 2 Study: Feasibility of measuring viral load longitudinally using home-collected dried blood spot specimens of high-risk MSM living with HIV (TUPDD0103)
    Richard Teran, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, United States
  • 13:30 – Developing and validating a model for risk-based differentiation of HIV prevention and testing services for female sex workers: Experiences from Maharashtra, India (TUPDD0104)
    Jimreeves Kirubakaran, FHI 360, India
  • 13:40 – Receipt of medication-assisted treatment halves the risk of HIV-1 RNA viral load rebound for HIV-positive women who use illicit drugs (TUPDD0105)
    Joella Adams, Brown University, United States
  • 13:50 – Police harassment and alcohol and drug abuse is associated with poorer 6-month retention among transgender women starting ART in a clinical trial in Argentina (TUPDD0106)
    Ines Aristegui, Fundacion Huesped, Argentina

 

Track C – Prevention Science
Tuesday, July 23, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.
Palacio de Valparaíso 2
http://programme.ias2019.org/Programme/Session/167

Co-Chairs:
Wafaa El-Sadr, ICAP at Columbia University, United States
Kenneth Mayer, Fenway Health, United States

Presentations:

  • First-in-human trial of MK-8591-eluting implants demonstrates concentrations suitable for HIV prophylaxis for at least one year
    Randolph P. Matthews, Merck & Co, United States
  • ASCENT: Phase 2a, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study evaluating safety and immunogenicity of two HIV-1 prophylactic vaccine regimens comprising Ad26.Mos4.HIV and either clade C gp140 or bivalent gp140
    Daniel J. Stieh, Janssen Vaccines & Prevention B.V, Netherlands
  • DISCOVER study for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP): F/TAF has a more rapid onset and longer sustained duration of HIV protection compared with F/TDF
    Christoph D. Spinner, University Hospital rechts der Isar, Germany
  • Safety, early continuation and adherence of same day PrEP initiation among MSM and TGW in Brazil, Mexico and Peru: the ImPrEP Study
    Valdiléa G. Veloso, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro (FIOCRUZ), Brazil

 

Tuesday, July 23, 5:00 – 6:00 p.m.
Palacios Level – Business Center – Meeting Room G

Presentations to include:

  • The use of routine TB/HIV cascades of care: the impact in quality of integrated services at sub-national and national levels
    Presented by: Pido Bongomin, ICAP at Columbia University, Eswatini

 


Posters
Wednesday hours: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Presentation hours: 12:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Sala B (Exhibition Level)

  • Urgent need to address multiple high-risk behavior and prevent HIV among young PWID (WEPED799)
    Presented by: Maria Lahuerta
  • Increased HIV prevalence and risk among women who inject drugs compared to men who inject drugs in Tajikistan (WEPED801)
    Presented by: Anna Deryabina
  • Multi-Country Evaluation of Survival and HIV-Free Survival among Children under 3 Years of Age of Women Living with HIV in Eight Sub-Saharan African Countries: Results from Population-based HIV Impact Assessments (LBPEC21)
    Presented by: Eugenie Poirot

 

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